Blogpost series #3: Consultations, Public Participation and Meaningful Stakeholder Engagement

Photo: Kvalsund, Norway /K. Buhmann 2019

Dansk version nedenfor


Normative foundations for stakeholder involvement in environmental and societal impact assessments

Karin Buhmann

A series of four short blog-post considers various aspects of stakeholder involvement as an element in the planning and decision-making relating to renewable energy, mining, infrastructure etc. We take point of departure in the overall question ‘what is a good process for engagement of affected stakeholders in the assessment concerning societal, environmental and/or human rights impacts from the individual’s perspective?’ The blog-posts disseminate preliminary results from project examining best practice in stakeholder engagement as part of impact assessment. The project partly builds on investigations and interviews in Greenland in August 2018 and Sápmi in June 2018. [Ref: NOS-HS project on Best practice for Impact Assessment of infrastructure projects in the Nordic Arctic: Popular participation and local needs, concerns and benefits, Principal Investigator: Karin Buhmann)]

The first blog-post described what a consultation entails, what one can expect from the process and result, and why good consultations processes are important for citizens and authorities as well as for companies. The second post examined what may constitute ’best practice’ for meaningful stakeholder engagement through consultations. This third post focused on the normative foundations, such as guidelines and legislation as well as some common features or practices for good stakeholder involvement in environmental and societal impact assessments. The fourth will consider what happen when consultations result in conflicts rather than understanding and why this happens.

Public requirements on consultations and corporate management of risk to society

Consultation of the public in the context of assessments of societal or environmental or impacts is not only common but mandated by law in several countries. In many places mandatory environmental impact assessment goes back to the 1970s. Mandatory impact assessments of other issues, such as societal sustainability or human rights, is a more recent phenomenon that to an extent builds on experiences gained around environmental impact assessment.

Even when impact assessment is not mandatory, it may be wise for a company to reach out to the local community and other potentially or actually affected stakeholders in order to map societal risks. This may contribute to counteracting a loss of the corporate ‘social licence to operate’. 

Recommendations on ’meaningful stakeholder engagement’ in societal impact assessments

It is a general expectation that companies conduct so-called ‘meaningful stakeholder engagement’ in order to identify potential or actual adverse impacts on, for example, the environment, labour conditions and human rights. This is a result of the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, a detailed set of recommendations from OECD member states as well as several countries in Africa and Latin-America. The recommendations target companies operating in or out of the relevant countries. Likewise, all companies (regardless of form and countries of registration or operation) engage meaningfully with affected stakeholders whose human rights are or may be harmed by a business activity, in order to understand and map the impact from the perspective of these affected. The United Nations (UN) Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights, which were a source for the 2011 update of the OECD Guidelines, refer to meaningful stakeholder engagement in this context. The objective is that the impact assessment be conducted in a manner that takes account of the affected stakeholders’ perception of risks or actual harm caused, that is, adopting a bottom-up perspective.

The company is expected to prevent risks and actual harm that it causes or contributes to. In can only do so if it understands the problems from the perspective of those who experience or fear the problems. OECD has developed a detailed guidance on meaningful stakeholder engagement for the extractive industries. The guidance includes an annex particularly on engagement of indigenous peoples. A translation into the Sami language was introduced at a seminar taking place back-to-back with the assembly of the Sami Parliament in Northern Norway in June 2019. Even so, at a meeting on mining and sustainability, which took place in Northern Sweden later in June 2019 we observed very limited awareness of the guidance and relevant global guidelines among local NGOs and other civil society organisations. In fact, awareness is higher with some companies. Lack of knowledge of the normative standards that apply to companies make it difficult for civil society to require that companies observe the norms.

The OECD Guidelines and the UN Guiding Principles are not binding but mark a tendency towards recognition of individual access to influence through making one’s views and concerns known, even if this may not take place through a formalized process. Overall, the past 40 years have witnessed a development in international environmental and human rights law towards direct access for the individual to partake in decision-making on business activities affecting one’s life (Pring and Noé, 2002). Rights of indigenous and tribal peoples to be involved in decision-making on mining and other forms of natural resource extraction are often highlighted in this context (Triggs, 2002). Consultations can form one element among others in ensuring such participation.

Mandatory requirements

The Nordic countries, which include Arctic areas, have long mandated planning of specific types of activities to include assessments of the environment so that the information can form part of the authorities informed decision-making. In some Nordic countries environmental impact assessments include broader societal aspects, such as impacts on health, employment, traditions and business operations (Nenasheva et al. 2015). Specific requirements of separate assessments of societal impacts are less common in a Nordic context. However, Greenland’s self-government has introduced explicit requirements in the Act on Raw Materials mandating social sustainability assessments of activities that are may have significant societal impacts. Greenland has also introduced rules enabling authorities to make permits conditional on the company contribution to society, for example through vocational capacity building, employment of local labour, or locally based processing of explored raw materials. Our project has shown that there are diverse opinions of such ’Impact Benefit Agreements’ (IBAs) that are tailored to each specific project and local context. While IBAs offers opportunities to agree on specific local measures, limited transparency on the contents reduce opportunities to develop solutions across projects.

Authorities can introduce specific requirements on the consultation process through general or special legislation. While such demands vary between countries, involvement of local communities and other affected stakeholders is a general element (Vanclay and Esteves, 2012).

Common demands on a good consultation process

As regulations and levels of detail vary between countries and types of impact assessments, specific demands on the process will not be described here. However, general indications are given by the so-called Aarhus Convention (UN 1998), which fleshes out the implications of the political decisions from the 1992 Rio Summit concerning public participation in decision-making concerning projects with environmental impacts. The convention also covers human health and safety, locations of cultural significance etc., provided the impacts have a connection to the environment. The Aarhus Convention establishes that the public must be informed about an activity in the early stages of a decision-making process. The information must, among other things, include the character of the activity; what permit is applied for; the responsible authorities, timeline, place and procedure for public consultations on the activity; and available information on the activity’s impacts on environment, health etc. The information must be free and provided as soon as it is available. Reasonable time should be set aside between different phases of the process, and therefore both to inform citizens and for citizens to prepare and actively participate in the decision-making process. The applicant for a permit is encouraged to actively engage in dialogue and to contribute information on the project. Authorities are responsible for making relevant information accessible, for example on the location for the activity, impacts on the environment in a the above sense (inclusive of health and safety), what measures will be taken to prevent adverse impacts, and alternatives to the proposed plan. A summary of the information must be provided in a non-technical form that can be understood without technical prerequisites. The consultation process must provide citizens with opportunities to express comments, information, knowledge and views that they find relevant. Citizens or NGOs who perceived their rights to be infringed upon are to have access to remedy provided by a court of law or another independent institution.

The Aarhus Convention has been signed by most European countries, including the Nordic states, and a few Central-Asian states.

Obviously, participation in a consultation process should not require participants to be familiar with the law, nor should the quality in principle depend on participant’s awareness of the informing normative foundations. It is possible, especially in countries with well-functioning public institutions, to ask the relevant authority to explain the rules and requirements and their implications. Elsewhere, civil society organisations are often able to provide advice and guidance.

Consultations aim to create dialogue, not conflict

Even if participation in a consultation is not a claim to having one’s view win out, a consultation is ideally a dialogue between citizens and the authorities or companies that conduct the consultation. Consultations build on an aim of exchanging knowledge, views, concerns and needs and thereby to provide the best possible informed foundation for decisions and for projects to be adapted and regulated in response to the concerns and needs that have been voiced or identified through the consultation. Both process and outcome depend on the involved understanding and respecting that the process builds on a conversation which is not about identifying a winner and a loser, but rather a dialogue towards an adapted result which may be a compromise between the original project idea and the thoughts, concerns and views expressed during the consultation process.

The final blogpost in this series considers the risk that efforts towards consultation create or reinforce conflicts despite intentions of the opposite.

References:

Esteves AM, Franks D, Vanclay F (2012) Social Impact Assessment: the state of the art, Impact Assessment And Project Appraisal 30(1) 43-42.

Nenasheva M, Bickford SH, Lesser P, Koivurola T & Kankaanpää P (2015) Legal tools of public participation in the Environmental Impact Assessment process and their application in the countries of the Barents Euro-Arctic Region, Barents Studies: Peoples, Economies and Politics 1(3) 13-35.

Pring, George (Rock) and  Susan Y. Noé (2002) The Emerging International Law of Public Participation Affecting Global Mining, Energy, and Resources Development, in Zillman, Donald M., Alastair Lucas and George (Rock) Pring (eds) Human Rights in Natural Resource Development: Public participation in the Sustainable Development of Mining and Energy Resources, Oxford Scholarship Online, DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199253784.003.0002

Triggs, Gillian (2002) The Rights of Indigenous Peoples to Participate in Resource Development: An International Legal Perspective, in Zillman, Donald M., Alastair Lucas and George (Rock) Pring (eds) Human Rights in Natural Resource Development: Public participation in the Sustainable Development of Mining and Energy Resources, Oxford Scholarship Online, DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199253784.003.0004.

UN (1998) Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-Making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters (Aarhus Convention).

About the author:

Karin Buhmann is Professor at Copenhagen Business School, where she is charged with the emergent field of Business and Human Rights. Her research interests include what makes stakeholder engagement meaningful from the perspective of so-called affected stakeholders, such as communities, and the implications for companies and public organisations carrying out impact assessments.


Dansk version

Blog-post serie #3: Høringer, offentlig deltagelse og meningsfuld borgerinddragelse

Photo: Kvalsund, Norway /K. Buhmann 2019

Regelgrundlag for borgerinddragelse i beslutninger med konsekvenser for miljø og samfund

Karin Buhmann

Indledning

I en serie på fire korte blog-indlæg ser vi på offentlig deltagelse som led i planlægning og beslutningsprocesser om grøn energi, minedrift, infrastruktur mv. Vi tager udgangspunkt i det overordnede spørgsmål ’Hvad er en god proces for borgerinddragelse i konsekvensvurdering (impact assessment) om samfundsmæssige, miljømæssige og/eller menneskerettigheds-indvirkninger fra borgerens perspektiv?’ Blogindlæggene formidler foreløbige resultater fra et projekt, som undersøger hvad er er god borgerinddragelse (’best practice’). Projektet bygger bl.a. på undersøgelser og interviews i Grønland i august 2018 og i Sápmi juni 2019. [Ref: NOS-HS project on Best practice for Impact Assessment of infrastructure projects in the Nordic Arctic: Popular participation and local needs, concerns and benefits (Principal Investigator: Karin Buhmann)]

Det første indlæg gennemgik, hvad høringer er, hvad man kan forvente sig som borger, og hvorfor solide høringsprocesser er vigtige for borgere, myndigheder og virksomheder. Det andet indlæg undersøgte, hvad der faktisk kan udgøre ’best practice’ for offentlig deltagelse gennem høringer. Dette tredje handler om det normative grundlag i form af retningslinjer og lovgivning og nogle gennemgående fælleskrav for involvering af offentligheden i vurdering af miljø- og samfundsmæssige konsekvenser. Det fjerde ser på hvad der sker, når adgang til offentlig deltagelse gennem bl.a. høringsprocesser skaber konflikt i stedet for forståelse og  hvorfor det sker.

Offentlige krav om høringer og virksomheders risikostyring

Høringer af offentligheden i forbindelse med vurdering af samfundsmæssig indvirkning, miljøkonsekvensvurdering, osv er ikke bare almindeligt men også lovbestemt i en række lande. Lovkrav om konsekvensvurderinger om miljø går mange steder tilbage til 1970erne. Lovkrav om andre emner – samfundsmæssig bæredygtighed og menneskerettigheder – er nyere og bygger i et vist omfang på de erfaringer, som er skabt omkring miljøkonsekvensvurdring.

Selvom der ikke findes lovkrav om gennemførelse af konsekvensvurdering eller krav fra f.eks. bevillingsgivere, kan det være en god idé for en virksomhed at tage kontakt til lokalsamfundet og andre, som kan påvirkes af en aktivitet, for at undersøge, hvilke samfundsmæssige risici der kan opstå. Det kan bidrage til at modvirke et tab af virksomhedens ’social licence to operate’.

Anbefalinger om ’meningsfuld interessentinddragelse’ i vurderingen af samfundsmæssige konsekvenser

Der en generel forventning om, at virksomheder foretager såkaldt ’meningsfuld interessentinddragelse’ med henblik på at identificere negativ indvirkning på bl.a. miljø, arbejdsforhold og menneskerettigheder. Det følger af OECDs Retningslinjer for Multinationale Virksomheder[ som er anbefalinger fra OECD-lande og en række lande i Afrika og Latinamerika til virksomheder, som arbejder i eller fra de lande. Tilsvarende er det en forventning, at alle virksomheder tager kontakt til lokalsamfund og andre, hvis menneskerettigheder er eller kan blive påvirket negativt af en erhvervsaktivitet, for at forstå indvirkningen eller risikoen fra deres perspektiv. FN’s vejledende principper om virksomheders menneskerettighedsansvar[, som gælder for alle virksomheder uanset form, hjemstat eller arbejdsland, taler også om meningsfuld interessentinddragelse i denne sammenhæng. Målet er, at konsekvensvurderingen foretages på en måde, der tager højde for lokalbefolkningens egen opfattelse af risici og problemer. Virksomheden skal forebygge risici og afbøde faktiske menneskerettighedskrænkelser eller anden skade, som den er involveret i. Det kan den kun gøre ordentligt, hvis den forstår problemerne fra det perspektiv, som dem, der oplever eller frygter problemerne, har. OECD har udarbejdet en detaljeret vejledning for meningsfuld interessentinddragelse i udvindingsindustrien. Vejledningen indeholder et særligt tillæg om inddragelse af oprindelige folk, og er netop blevet lanceret i en oversættelse til samisk, som blev præsenteret i forbindelse et møde ved det samiske parlament i Norge i juni 2019. Ikke desto mindre oplevede vi på et møde i juni 2019 i Nordsverige om minedrift og bæredygtighed i global sammenhæng, at kendskabet til vejledningen og de overordnede vejledende globale retningslinjer var meget begrænset blandt NGOer og andre repræsentanter for civilsamfundet. Faktisk er kendskabet større hos mange virksomheder. Manglende kendskab til de normative krav, som gælder for virksomhederne, gør det vanskeligt for civilsamfundet og organisationer at stille krav om, at virksomhederne overholder dem. 

OECDs retningslinjer og FNs vejledende principper er ikke bindende, men markerer en tendens i retning af at anerkende den enkeltes adgang til indflydelse ved at blive spurgt og hørt – også hvor det ikke sker gennem en lovbestemt formaliseret proces. I det hele taget er der i de seneste 40 år foregået en udvikling inden for international miljø- og menneskeret i retning af direkte adgang for den enkelte til at deltage i beslutningsprocesser om erhvervsaktiviteter, der påvirker vedkommendes liv (Pring and Noé, 2002). Særligt oprindelige folks adgang til beslutningsprocesser om minedrift og andre former for naturressourceudvinding understreges ofte (Triggs, 2002). Høringsprocesser kan udgøre et element i sikring af denne deltagelse.

Lovkrav

De nordiske lande har længe haft lovkrav om, at der ved planer om bestemte typer aktiviteter skal gennemføres en vurdering af konsekvenser for miljøet, således at oplysningerne indgår i myndighedernes grundlag for at træffe beslutning om, hvorvidt der kan gives tilladelse til at planerne gennemføres. I nogle af de nordiske lande omfatter miljøkonsekvensvurderingen også bredere samfundsmæssige aspekter, indvirkningen på lokalsamfundet, for eksempel i forhold til erhverv, sundhed, beskæftigelse og traditioner (Nenasheva m.fl. 2015). Krav om deciderede, separate vurderinger af samfundsmæssig og sociale indvirkninger er mindre almindelige i en nordisk sammenhæng, men Grønlands selvstyre har i Råstofloven gennemført eksplicit krav om vurdering af samfundsmæssig bæredygtighed i forhold til aktiviteter, der vurderes at kunne få væsentlig indvirkning på samfundsmæssige forhold. Grønland har også indført regler, som gør det muligt for myndighederne at stille krav om, at virksomheder som vilkår for tilladelse efter Råstofloven skal bidrage til samfundet. Dette kan for eksempel gennem faglig uddannelse og ansættelse af lokal arbejdskraft eller lokal forarbejdning af udvundne råstoffer. Vores projekt har vist, at der er forskellige holdninger til sådanne ’Impact Benefit Agreements’, som er skræddersyet til det konkrete projekt og den lokale kontekst. På den ene side giver det mulighed for at aftale særlige lokale tiltag. På den anden side kan muligheden for at lave samlede gode løsninger på tværs af projekterne blive mindre.

Lovgivningen kan også fastlægge krav til høringsprocessen. Disse krav varierer fra land til land. Det er dog et grundlæggende element, at konsekvensvurderinger blandt andet skal inddrage lokalbefolkningen og andre, som bliver direkte berørt af de ny projekter (Vanclay and Esteves, 2012).

Almindelige krav til en ordentlig høringsproces

Da reglerne og detaljeringsgraden varierer fra land til land og mellem forskellige typer konsekvensvurdering, kan kravene til processen ikke beskrives detaljeret her. Et generelt fingerpeg om processerne kan udledes af den såkaldte Aarhuskonvention (FN 1998), som udmønter de politiske beslutninger fra Rio-topmødet i 1992 vedr. offentlig deltagelse i beslutninger om projekter med indvirkning på miljøet. Konventionen omfatter også menneskers sundhed og sikkerhed, steder med kulturel betydning mv, hvor indvirkningen har forbindelse til miljøet. Aarhus-konventionen fastslår blandt andet, at offentligheden skal informeres tidligt i forløbet af en beslutningsproces om en aktivitet. Oplysningerne skal omfatte blandt andet hvad aktiviteten går ud på; hvad der søges tilladelse til; hvilken myndigheder der er ansvarlig; tidsplan, sted og procedure i øvrigt for offentlige høringer om aktiviteten; og de oplysninger som findes om aktivitetens indvirkning på miljø, sundhed mv. Oplysningerne skal være gratis og gives så snart de er tilgængelige. Der skal være rimelig tid til de forskellige faser i processen, og dermed både til at informere borgerne og til at borgerne kan forberede dig og deltage aktivt under beslutningsprocessen. Ansøgeren til en tilladelse til aktiviteter opfordres til aktivt at indgå i dialog og bidrage med oplysninger om projektidéen. Det er myndighedernes ansvar, at de relevante oplysninger er tilgængelige, bl.a. om stedet hvor aktiviteten skal finde sted, konsekvenser for miljøet i ovenstående brede forstand (inklusive sundhed og sikkerhed), hvordan negative indvirkninger vil blive forebygget, og alternativer til den foreslåede plan. Der skal gives et resume af oplysningerne i en form, som ikke er teknisk og dermed til at forstå uden særlige faglige forudsætninger. Høringsprocessen skal give borgerne mulighed for at udtrykke kommentarer, oplysninger, viden og holdninger, som de mener er relevante. Borgere eller NGOer som mener, at deres rettigheder ikke er respekteret, skal have mulighed for at klage til en domstol eller anden uafhængig instans.

Århuskonventionen er underskrevet af de fleste europæiske lande, herunder de nordiske, samt enkelte lande i Centralasien.

Deltagelse i en høringsproces skal naturligvis ikke forudsætte, at deltagerne kender lovgivningen, ligesom processens kvalitet heller ikke i princippet bør afhængige af, at deltagerne kender lovgrundlaget. Især i lande med velfungerende offentlige institutioner kan man, i hvert fald i princippet, henvende sig til den relevante myndighed og bede om at få forklaret, hvad reglerne er og hvad de betyder for en selv. Andre steder kan civilsamfundsorganisationer/NGOer somme tider hjælpe med råd og vejledning.

Høringer har som mål at skabe dialog og tilpasning – ikke konflikt

En høring er ideelt en dialog mellem borgere og myndigheder eller virksomheder, som gennemfører høringen. Høringer bygger på et mål om at udveksle viden, holdninger, bekymringer og behov og derigennem skabe det bedst muligt oplyste grundlag for beslutninger og for at projekter bliver tilpasset og reguleret i forhold til de bekymringer og behov, som er kommet til udtryk gennem høringen. Både proces og resultat er afhængige af, at de involverede forstår og respekterer, at processen bygger på samtale, og at der ikke er tale om at finde en vinder og en taber men derimod en dialogproces hen imod en form for tilpasset resultat, som kan være – men dog ikke altid er – er et kompromis mellem den oprindelige projektidé og de overvejelser, bekymringer og behov, som er kommet frem under høringsprocessen.

Det næste og sidste indlæg i denne serie ser nærmere på risikoen for, at tiltag til borgerinddragelse skaber konflikt, trods hensigt om det modsatte

Henvisninger

FN (1998) Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-Making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters (Aarhus Convention).

Esteves AM, Franks D, Vanclay F (2012) Social Impact Assessment: the state of the art, Impact Assessment And Project Appraisal 30(1) 43-42.

Nenasheva M, Bickford SH, Lesser P, Koivurola T & Kankaanpää P (2015) Legal tools of public participation in the Environmental Impact Assessment process and their application in the countries of the Barents Euro-Arctic Region, Barents Studies: Peoples, Economies and Politics 1(3) 13-35.

Pring, George (Rock) and  Susan Y. Noé (2002) The Emerging International Law of Public Participation Affecting Global Mining, Energy, and Resources Development, in Zillman, Donald M., Alastair Lucas and George (Rock) Pring (eds) Human Rights in Natural Resource Development: Public participation in the Sustainable Development of Mining and Energy Resources, Oxford Scholarship Online, DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199253784.003.0002

Triggs, Gillian (2002) The Rights of Indigenous Peoples to Participate in Resource Development: An International Legal Perspective, in Zillman, Donald M., Alastair Lucas and George (Rock) Pring (eds) Human Rights in Natural Resource Development: Public participation in the Sustainable Development of Mining and Energy Resources, Oxford Scholarship Online, DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199253784.003.0004.

Om forfatteren

Karin Buhmann er professor med særlige opgaver inden for virksomheders ansvar for menneskerettigheder. Hun arbejder blandt andet med, hvad der gør offentlig inddragelse i konsekvensvurderingen meningsfuld fra de berørte borgeres vinkel, og hvad det betyder for virksomheder og myndigheder i forhold til konsekvensvurderinger.  Hun er ansat på Handelshøjskolen i København (også kaldet Copenhagen Business School).